Nokia Products Review







read more Details
Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Intended for the PowerPoint and Palm Pilot crowd, this dense book is packed with the results of Steinbock's prodigious research into the mobile communications behemoth, including reams of charts, stats and history that are likely to overwhelm casual readers. Nokia, which now dominates wireless communications worldwide, started in 1865 as a small timber concern in rural Finland. A little more than 100 years later, it merged with a rubber works company and a cabling firm to form the Nokia Corporation. In the late 1970s and '80s, the energetic and charming Kari Kairamo guided the company's transformation into a diversified, global corporation that led many extraordinary advances in portable communications. Tragically, the mercurial Kairamo committed suicide in 1988. Jorma Ollila was made CEO in 1992. While Motorola and Ericsson concentrated on developing new technologies during the 1990s, Nokia focused on digital (as opposed to analog) phones. Today, Nokia makes about one out of every three cell phones in the world and is truly international: about half of the company's 55,000 employees (all of whom speak English) are Finnish, yet less than 3% of Nokia's revenues come from Finland. While the author, a "visiting virtual professor" at the Helsinki School of Economics as well as a researcher at the Columbia Business School, is clearly enamored with the company, he never slips into mindless praise, letting Nokia's record speak for itself. (June 29)Forecast: The dot-coms are going up in smoke, but we still have our Nokias. Amid New Economy eulogies, readers interested in mobile communications and corporate strategy will be glad to find a high-tech success story they can still believe in.
Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

Steinbock tells the story of Nokia, the 140-year-old Finnish company that has become a global powerhouse in mobile communications and a leader in the development of third-generation wireless services. The company's management obviously cooperated in this report, for we see how it thinks, how it listens to its markets, and how it has designed remarkable strategies, all of which have, in the last 10 years, made the company a case study in corporate success, with stock trading in May 2000 at approximately 100 times earnings. This is excellent public relations for the company, which the author describes as unique in its persistence, its alignment between upstream and downstream innovation, and its recent dogged efforts to globalize and conquer world markets. Part 1 recounts the history of the company, Part 2 covers the creation and evolution of Nokia's globalization strategy, and part 3 describes Nokia's preparation and innovation. A formidable global competitor, the company has its sights now set on the "next big thing": the mobile Internet. Mary Whaley
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved
See all Editorial Reviews

Intended for the PowerPoint and Palm Pilot crowd, this dense book is packed with the results of Steinbock's prodigious research into the mobile communications behemoth, including reams of charts, stats and history that are likely to overwhelm casual readers. Nokia, which now dominates wireless communications worldwide, started in 1865 as a small timber concern in rural Finland. A little more than 100 years later, it merged with a rubber works company and a cabling firm to form the Nokia Corporation. In the late 1970s and '80s, the energetic and charming Kari Kairamo guided the company's transformation into a diversified, global corporation that led many extraordinary advances in portable communications. Tragically, the mercurial Kairamo committed suicide in 1988. Jorma Ollila was made CEO in 1992. While Motorola and Ericsson concentrated on developing new technologies during the 1990s, Nokia focused on digital (as opposed to analog) phones. Today, Nokia makes about one out of every three cell phones in the world and is truly international: about half of the company's 55,000 employees (all of whom speak English) are Finnish, yet less than 3% of Nokia's revenues come from Finland. While the author, a "visiting virtual professor" at the Helsinki School of Economics as well as a researcher at the Columbia Business School, is clearly enamored with the company, he never slips into mindless praise, letting Nokia's record speak for itself. (June 29)Forecast: The dot-coms are going up in smoke, but we still have our Nokias. Amid New Economy eulogies, readers interested in mobile communications and corporate strategy will be glad to find a high-tech success story they can still believe in.
Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.


Steinbock tells the story of Nokia, the 140-year-old Finnish company that has become a global powerhouse in mobile communications and a leader in the development of third-generation wireless services. The company's management obviously cooperated in this report, for we see how it thinks, how it listens to its markets, and how it has designed remarkable strategies, all of which have, in the last 10 years, made the company a case study in corporate success, with stock trading in May 2000 at approximately 100 times earnings. This is excellent public relations for the company, which the author describes as unique in its persistence, its alignment between upstream and downstream innovation, and its recent dogged efforts to globalize and conquer world markets. Part 1 recounts the history of the company, Part 2 covers the creation and evolution of Nokia's globalization strategy, and part 3 describes Nokia's preparation and innovation. A formidable global competitor, the company has its sights now set on the "next big thing": the mobile Internet. Mary Whaley
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved